88 Million Nigerians Now Living In Extreme Poverty As 1.1 Million Slipped Into Extreme Poverty In The Last Four Months



The number of Nigerians living in extreme poverty — or below $1.90 a day has jumped to 88 million.

In June 2018, the Brookings Institution named Nigeria as the poverty capital of the world, with 86.9 million extremely poor people.

Nigeria overtook India as the world poverty capital, despite being six times smaller in population than the Asian country.

According to the World Poverty Clock, created by Vienna-based World Data Lab, 88,011,759 Nigerians are currently living in extreme poverty.

The World Bank, IMF, United Nations, and major development institutions across the world forecast that Nigeria will not hit the 2030 target for ending global poverty.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation also suggests that West Africa, primarily, Nigeria will host 40 percent of the world’s poorest people by 2030.


According to the World Poverty Clock, “the outlook for poverty alleviation in Nigeria is currently weak,” with nearly six people slipping into extreme poverty every minute.

“Nevertheless, the overall effect will be muted; by 2030 we estimate the percentage of Nigeria’spopulation living in extreme poverty will increase from 44.2% to 45.5%, representing a total of some 120 million people living under $1.90 per day.”

Brookings had said earlier in the year that “extreme poverty in Nigeria is growing by six people every minute, while poverty in India continues to fall”.

“In fact, by the end of 2018 in Africa as a whole, there will probably be about 3.2 million more people living in extreme poverty than there are today.”

But worse, according to the World Poverty Clock created by an Austria-based World Data Lab, in the past 4 months, 1.1 million Nigerians have slipped into extreme poverty, living on below $1.90 per day. This now brings the total number of Nigerians in extreme poverty to 88 million.

A problem that is more likely than not to multiply because, as we reported earlier in the year, Nigeria is still on course to become the world’s third largest country by 2050. And if history has taught us anything, it is that our problems are directly proportional to our number.

All major development institutions across the world predict that Nigeria will not attain the 2030 target for ending global poverty; and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have reports that suggest West Africa, primarily, Nigeria will host 40% of the world’s poorest people by 2030.






While countries like Ethiopia, Ghana and Mauritania are working to end extreme poverty by 2030 and meet the United Nation's goals, Nigeria is clearly not as bothered. We have quite literally spent the past 30 years spreading poverty as widely as possible.

No comments:
Write comments

Contact us

enioladaniel2014@gmail.com eniaroo@yahoo.com Adverts: 08160223638